Friday, 15 March 2019

Weekly Reading - Some Interesting Stuff

A wonderful article on St├ęphane Breitwieser, who robbed nearly 200 museums, amassed a collection of treasures worth more than $1.4 billion.
When it comes to stealing from museums, St├ęphane Breitwieser is virtually peerless. He is one of the most prolific and successful art thieves who has ever lived. Done right, his technique—daytime, no violence, performed like a magic trick, sometimes with guards in the room—never involves a dash to a getaway car. 


A detailed look at how the shared economy is shaping the traditional business model and how the hotel business is adapting and changing to the new situation.


Delivery robots can, over time, also become "goods-shifting" robots.
If the arrival of automated delivery robots could lower the effort to sell or return goods to the minimal amount it now takes to buy them, users might exchange products through a new kind of logistical network that would make the process of acquiring and trading physical objects as frictionless as that of downloading and deleting digital files. Users might trade products among themselves through new kinds of logistical networks — a kind of peer-to-peer sharing for physical objects.


Algorithms can now make your psychological profile from your social media interactions! That has major commercial ramifications like advertising targeted to your specific moods. This, and other kinds of profiling, are not limited to only social media.
There are systems today which automate a job interview: job seekers speak with a computer by telephone, which then creates a detailed psychogram based on their responses.  Software that analyzes faces for clues to mood, personality or other psychological features is being explored as well. 


A fascinating glimpse into the thought process of Vaclav Smil.
Confusing models with reality is a cardinal sin of clear thinking. If you believe too strongly in your models of the world, you can start to ignore evidence that your model is wrong.
https://thepolymathproject.com/a-few-principles-for-thinking-clearly/



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